Soaring temperatures in south-east Queensland a ‘sign of what’s to come’ this spring





Updated

September 04, 2019 05:57:52

South-east Queensland is expected to get a taste of summer this week due to hotter-than-average temperatures, with some parts of the region set to hit 35 degrees Celsius.

Key points:

  • The temperatures are unusual for early September, with Brisbane city’s average temperature for this time about 25C, BOM says
  • The above average temperatures are caused by a high pressure system over southern Queensland, moving to the west
  • The Queensland Ambulance Service is urging people to take extra care when outdoors during the week and look after elderly relatives or neighbours in the hotter conditions

The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) said Brisbane was expected to reach 33C today, 31C on Thursday and 34C on Friday.

The maximum temperature in Ipswich, west of Brisbane, is set to be 36C on Friday β€” 11C above average.

BOM forecaster Michael Knepp said the temperatures were unusual for early September, with Brisbane city’s average temperature for this time about 25C.

“It’s rare to see a run of these days with temperatures 8 degrees above average,” he said.

“This is just sort of taste of what’s to come over the next few months.”

Mr Knepp said the above-average temperatures are caused by a high-pressure system over southern Queensland, moving to the west.

Last year, the first day above 30C for Brisbane was in late October.

Brisbane reached record-breaking temperature highs for September in 2017, when the city reached 37C on September 29.

Mr Knepp said the next few days would also see large temperatures ranges, with the evenings remaining cool.

“For instance Ipswich today will have a minimum temperature of 6 degrees but by the afternoon will have a maximum temperature of 35 β€” that’s almost a 30 degree temperature range,” he said.

“Even though those temperatures are quite warm in the afternoon, it’s only going to few hours, and we are going to get some relief in the overnight hours with it feeling cool when you wake up.”

The Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) urged people to take extra care when outdoors during the week.

QAS advanced care paramedic Ian Pyper said people needed to look after themselves and elderly relatives or neighbours in the hotter conditions.

“It’s important to remember to keep hydrated over this time,” he said.

“Drink plenty of water, go easy on any drinks containing alcohol and caffeine.

“If you can, slow down and avoid strenuous activity, especially between the hours of 10:00am and 3:00pm.”

Mr Pyper said to also be aware of heatstroke symptoms, which included dizziness, disorientation and confusion.

“If you’re concerned that anyone is suffering a heat-related condition, try to cool them down, loosen any clothing, and if you’re particularly concerned for their welfare, call triple-0,” he said.

Fire danger rating to soar

The Queensland Fire and Emergency Service (QFES) said hot and dry conditions would see the fire danger rating soar in parts of the south-east in coming days.

A local fire ban will be in place from today until midday on Friday in Ipswich, Somerset, Lockyer Valley, Scenic Rim, Logan and the Gold Coast.

Under a local fire ban, open fires are prohibited and all permits to light fire which have been issued in areas will been cancelled.

Topics:

weather,

climate-change,

emergency-planning,

bushfire,

fires,

disasters-and-accidents,

phenomena,

brisbane-4000,

bundaberg-4670,

maroochydore-4558,

southport-4215,

qld,

toowoomba-4350,

beaudesert-4285,

australia,

logan-city-dc-4114,

upper-lockyer-4352,

lockyer-4344,

ipswich-4305,

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First posted

September 04, 2019 05:52:33



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